Valerie Jenness UCI Professor 

 

 

Valerie Jenness is a Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on the links between deviance and social control; the politics of crime control; social movements and social change; and corrections and public policy. She is the author of four books, including most recently Appealing to Justice: Prisoners, Grievances, and the Carceral Logic in the Post-Civil Rights Era (with Kitty Calavita, University of California Press, 2015); and many articles published in sociology, law, and criminology journals.

Her work has been honored with awards from the American Sociological Association, Society for the Study of Social Problems, the Pacific Sociological Association, the Law and Society Association, the Western Society of Criminology, University of California, and Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights in North America. Professor Jenness has experience working with CDCR officials at every level, from administrators at Agency to wardens at prisons throughout the state to frontline officers working in the prisons. Her studies of sexual assault in prisons, the management of prisoners with mental health concerns, transgender prisoners, and the inmate appeals system in prison have broken new ground and informed public policy.

In addition, she has served on the Governor’s Rehabilitation Strike Team to assist with the implementation of AB 900, focusing on classification and endorsement. More recently, she has worked with the Los Angeles Police Department and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to develop and implement innovative policy related to the management and care of transgender prisoners.

 

Presidential Sidekick

UCI alumna recounts her time as Obama’s personal assistant

ROY RIVENBURG / UCI ON

 

She met the pope and Miss Piggy, kept President Obama on schedule and taught the leader of the free world how to “Zot!”

For three years, UCI alumna Ferial Govashiri was a whirlwind at the Oval Office, where she served as the commander in chief’s personal assistant and occasional chess opponent.

President Barack Obama and UCI alumna Ferial Govashiri, who served as his personal aide, walk through the Green Room at the White House. Pete Souza / The White House

President Barack Obama and UCI alumna Ferial Govashiri, who served as his personal aide, walk through the Green Room at the White House.
Pete Souza / The White House

On Jan. 20, she returned to civilian life and began plotting her next act, which includes writing a book, although not about what you might expect.

But first, she’s taking a breather.

“It still hasn’t hit me that the job ended,” says Govashiri, a 2005 political science graduate. “Even now, if I take a nap, I wake up in a panic, wondering ‘Where’s my phone? What have I forgotten to do?’”

The adventure began in 2007, when her bosses at a Pasadena political consulting firm recommended her to one of their Chicago office’s clients – a senator named Barack Obama. At the request of his staff, Govashiri “flew to Iowa and did a rally there. Then I was invited to New Hampshire and then to South Carolina. Finally, I said, ‘I have to go home to Laguna Hills to get new clothes.’”

Soon, the Iranian-born Anteater was helping to manage the future president’s campaign advance team. After the election, she segued to a post at the National Security Council, where her duties included planning Obama’s foreign trips. In May 2014, she became his personal aide, sitting at a desk right outside the Oval Office.

From that vantage point, camped beneath an oil painting of the Statue of Liberty, Govashiri directed traffic, steering a parade of politicians and luminaries into and out of the president’s orbit. She obsessively eyed the clock to keep Obama on time, set up his phone calls and scrambled to ensure that he had all the documents needed for meetings.

“There were days I felt like mission control,” Govashiri says.

The job had its quirky moments, such as playing chess with the president, meeting Miss Piggy (who stopped by for a Christmas ceremony), watching Obama test a pair of virtual reality goggles and getting bombarded with letters – many from prison inmates – seeking Govashiri’s help.

She also once crashed a private meeting between the president and Pope Francis to let them know the pontiff was late for his parade.

Other incidents on Govashiri’s highlight reel include:

  • Dancing with the commander in chief outside the Oval Office
  • Riding in a 100-car motorcade through Myanmar as thousands of people lined the streets (“Presidential motorcades are the coolest thing ever,” she says. “Seeing one in person is unreal.”)
  • Encountering actors George Clooney and Leonardo DiCaprio at the White House (“They definitely have auras about them.”)
  • Accompanying Obama when he delivered UCI’s 50th anniversary commencement address in 2014 (One of the graduating seniors was Govashiri’s brother, Sina. Obama made the trek after UCI students and alumni deluged the White House with 10,000 postcards asking him to speak. The president told the crowd at Angel Stadium of Anaheim, “You had the inside track in getting me here because my personal assistant, Ferial, is a proud Anteater.” He then joked, “Until today, I did not understand why she greets me every morning by shouting ‘Zoot! Zoot! Zoot!’”)

Although the job entailed long hours, Govashiri nevertheless squeezed in time to date, plan a wedding and get married. For her ceremony in Orange County, Obama secretly taped a video message that was played at the reception. “I have no idea how he did that,” she says, “because I tracked everything he did each day.”

Now that her boss and colleagues have scattered to make way for a new administration, Govashiri hopes to move back to Southern California and find a career in which “media and technology intersect.” She also wants to write a children’s book about the history behind some of the monuments in Washington, D.C.

In the meantime, Govashiri has signed up with a speakers’ bureau to give talks about her West Wing exploits and the lessons she learned along the way. Working in the White House will be a tough act to follow, she says: “It isn’t often you get a front seat to history.”

Full Article: https://news.uci.edu/feature/presidential-sidekick/

Valerie Jenness

Valerie Jenness Wiki | UCI Professor Criminology Law Society by Valerie Jenness on Scribd

Her research has focused on prostitution, hate crime, and prison violence and grievances to explore the links between deviance and social control, the politics of crime control, social movements and social change, and corrections and public policy. She is the author of four books, including: Appealing to Justice: Prisoner Grievances, Rights, and Carceral Logic (with Kitty Calavita); Making Hate a Crime: From Social Movement to Law Enforcement Practice (with Ryken Grattet); Hate Crimes: New Social Movements and the Politics of Violence (with Kendal Broad); and Making it Work: The Prostitutes’ Rights Movement in Perspective. She is also the co-editor of Routing the Opposition: Social Movements, Public Policy, and Democracy (with David Meyer and Helen Ingram) and the author of many articles published in sociology, law, and criminology journals.

Valerie Jenness

Hate Crime Law Professor Valerie Jenness Criminology Department

Principles underlying an evolving body of hate crime law, indicating how disabilities, as a status provision, might “fit” within its basic parameters. This article describes the general framework and principles underlying an evolving body of hate crime law, indicating how disabilities, as a status provision, might “fit” within its basic parameters.

 

Valerie Jenness UCI Professor Criminology Social Ecology

In today’s modern society, it is undeniable that discrimination is still existent. From workplaces to public spaces, a lot are still discriminated, especially transgender. This extends all the way to prisons. There is a growing debate as to whether they should be placed in male or female cells. Reports were also abundant emphasizing how many transgender suffer from rape and hate crimes inside the prisons.

Professor Valerie Jenness is one of the experts who have explored more on this issue. Highlights of her study will be further discussed below. An expert in criminology, law, and sociology, Valerie Jenness had some interesting findings in her studies. Gender Segregation in Prisons One of the issues that have been explored by Valerie Jenness deals with how inmates are segregated. Up until now, prisons are segregated based on binary genders — male and female prison cells.

There is no dedicated cell for transgender prisons, which is exactly one of the reasons why they are referred to as the “forgotten group”. In one study that involved more than 300 transgender women in prisons, the conclusion was that most of them would prefer to be with men, in spite of being at high risk of assault.

Valerie Jenness

Valerie Jenness – Hate Crimes – Britannica

Valerie Jenness | Hate Crime | Britannica by Valerie Jenness on Scribd

 

Valerie Jenness on Hate Crime – Harassment, intimidation, or physical violence that is motivated by a bias against characteristics of the victim considered integral to his social identity, such as his race, ethnicity, or religion. Some relatively broad hate-crime laws also include sexual orientation and mental or physical disability among the characteristics that define a hate crime. The concept of hate crime emerged in the United States in the late 1970s.

By the end of the 20th century, laws mandating additional penalties for bias-motivated crimes had been passed by the federal government and by most U.S. states. (Unlike many broader state laws, the federal law allowed for the prosecution of hate crimes motivated only by the colour, race, religion, or national origin of the victim.) Increasingly, criminal conduct motivated by bigotry came to be regarded as substantially different from, and in some respects more pernicious than, other kinds of crime.

Valerie Jenness

Global climate change is being felt in many coastal communities of the United States, not always in the form of big weather disasters but as a steady drip, drip, drip of nuisance flooding.

According to researchers at the University of California, Irvine, rising sea levels will cause these smaller events to become increasingly frequent in the future, and the cumulative effect will be comparable to extreme events such as Hurricane Katrina or Superstorm Sandy.

“Catastrophic storms get a lot of media attention and are studied, but we wanted to know more about the non-extreme events,” said Amir AghaKouchak, UCI associate professor of civil & environmental engineering and co-author of a new study on cumulative hazards in the American Geophysical Union journal Earth’s Future.

“These diffuse floods happen multiple times a month or year,” he said. “They don’t kill anyone, they don’t damage buildings, but over time they have extremely high-cost outcomes, and it happens without us realizing it.”

In Washington, D.C., for instance, the number of hours of nuisance flooding per year has grown from 19 between 1930 and 1970 to 94 over the last two decades. Projections suggest that there could be as many as 700 hours of nuisance flooding per year by 2050. The capital’s monuments, marinas, parks, public transportation infrastructure, roads and businesses could be affected. The UCI researchers found similar potential impacts in four other American cities: Miami, New York, Seattle and San Francisco.

Climate change is driving the growth of cumulative hazards, they noted. A full moon on a clear night triggering higher tides is now enough to cause flooding, because ocean levels are so high.

“The frequency is increasing because of sea level rise,” AghaKouchak said. “We call it clear-sky flooding. There’s no rain, but if you have a higher-than-usual tide, you get flooding in these coastal areas.”

Valerie Jenness

Global climate change is being felt in many coastal communities of the United States, not always in the form of big weather disasters but as a steady drip, drip, drip of nuisance flooding.

According to researchers at the University of California, Irvine, rising sea levels will cause these smaller events to become increasingly frequent in the future, and the cumulative effect will be comparable to extreme events such as Hurricane Katrina or Superstorm Sandy.

“Catastrophic storms get a lot of media attention and are studied, but we wanted to know more about the non-extreme events,” said Amir AghaKouchak, UCI associate professor of civil & environmental engineering and co-author of a new study on cumulative hazards in the American Geophysical Union journal Earth’s Future.

“These diffuse floods happen multiple times a month or year,” he said. “They don’t kill anyone, they don’t damage buildings, but over time they have extremely high-cost outcomes, and it happens without us realizing it.”

In Washington, D.C., for instance, the number of hours of nuisance flooding per year has grown from 19 between 1930 and 1970 to 94 over the last two decades. Projections suggest that there could be as many as 700 hours of nuisance flooding per year by 2050. The capital’s monuments, marinas, parks, public transportation infrastructure, roads and businesses could be affected. The UCI researchers found similar potential impacts in four other American cities: Miami, New York, Seattle and San Francisco.

Climate change is driving the growth of cumulative hazards, they noted. A full moon on a clear night triggering higher tides is now enough to cause flooding, because ocean levels are so high.

Scholarship Established to Honor Professor Laura L. Appleton

 

Central Washington University professor of Sociology Laura L. Appleton wanted to make sure students like her had opportunities for continued education.

With that in mind, the family and friends of the late educator have donated $400,000 to establish the Laura L. Appleton Endowment for Graduate Study in Sociology to help a CWU sociology major attend the graduate program of his or her choice.

“The transition between undergraduate and graduate school can be very challenging, especially for first-generation students,” said Staci Sleigh-Layman, director of human resources at Central Washington University and a colleague of Appleton’s. “Faculty will then support the students in their transition (with the help from the Laura L. Appleton Endowment Scholarship).”

Jay Osborn, Appleton’s former teaching assistant at Central and close friend, said the scholarship will be an instrumental tool for first-generation and second-generation college students to move forward in their careers.

Sociology Department faculty will help identify potential scholarship recipients. The scholarship will be awarded in May of each year with the scholarship disbursed the following year. Application materials include a completed cover letter, academic resume, and a 500-word essay detailing life experience leading to graduate school, as well as academic and career goals including plans for sociological contributions.